Title

Modified Seed Growth of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Benzyl Alcohol – Optimization for Heating and Broad Stability in Biomedical Applications

Document Type

Article

Original Publication Date

2014

Journal/Book/Conference Title

Nanobiomedicine

Volume

1

First Page

1

Last Page

15

DOI of Original Publication

10.5772/60035

Date of Submission

December 2015

Abstract

Iron oxide nanoparticles have received sustained interest for biomedical applications as synthetic approaches are continually developed for control of nanoparticle properties. However, many approaches focus solely on the material, rather than the complete optimization of synthesis and functionalization together to enhance translation into biological systems. Presented herein is a modified seed growth method designed for obtaining optimal nanoparticle properties and ease of surface functionalization for long term stability. With a one or two addition process, iron oxide nanoparticles were produced in crystallite sizes ranging from 5-15 nm using only benzyl alcohol and an iron precursor. In the functionalization process, concentration variations were required for stabilizing different nanoparticle sizes. Radio frequency induction heating experiments of various crystallite and hydrodynamic sizes verified that the heating efficiency greatly increased while approaching the 15 nm crystallite, and suggested an important role of the overall particle size on heating efficiency. Initial in vitro experiments with the functionalized nanoparticles showed success in providing hyperthermia-induced tumour cell killing without an increase in the temperature of the cell suspension medium. This demonstrates the potential for nanoparticle-based hyperthermia to provide a therapeutic effect while limiting normal tissue damage.

Is Part Of

VCU Chemistry Publications

Recommended Citation

Stanley E. Gilliland III, Everett E. Carpenter and Michael D. Shultz. Modified Seed Growth of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Benzyl Alcohol – Optimization for Heating and Broad Stability in Biomedical Applications. Nanobiomedicine, 2014, 1:9. doi: 10.5772/60035