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Authors

Jack D. Forbes

Orginal Publication Date

1984

Journal Title

Explorations in Ethnic Studies

Volume

7

Issue

ees/vol7/iss2

First Page

11

Last Page

23

Abstract

In 1854 the California State Supreme Court sought to bar all non-Caucasians from equal citizenship and civil rights. The court stated: The word "Black" may include all Negroes, but the term "Negro" does not include all Black persons . . . . We are of the opinion that the words "White," "Negro," "Mulatto" and "Black person," whenever they occur in our constitution . . . must be taken in their generic sense . . . that the words "Black person," in the 14th section must be taken as contra distinguished from White, and necessarily includes all races other than the Caucasian.[1] As convoluted as the quote may be, it tends to express a strong tendency in the history of the United States, toward creating two broad classes of people: white and non-white, citizen and non-citizen (or semi-citizen).

Rights

Copyright, ​©EES, The National Association for Ethnic Studies, 1984

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