Defense Date

2006

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Adult Health Nursing

First Advisor

Dr. Jeanne Salyer

Abstract

This descriptive, correlational study was based on Pender's Health Promotion Model (Pender, Murdaugh, & Parsons, 2002). The purpose was to examine factors influencing health status in community-dwelling, older white and black adults. The following research question was addressed by the study: What are the relationships among the individual characteristics (age, gender, race, education, and income); the behavior-specific cognitions and affect (perceived self-efficacy, perceived barriers, and interpersonal influences); and the behavioral outcomes (health-promoting behaviors), and health status in community-dwelling whites and blacks 65 years of age and older? The convenience sample of 113 participants from four congregate meal sites in Central Virginia represented 46% of the young-old (aged 65 to 74 years); 83% females, 76% blacks, and 43% less than high school educated. Twenty-one percent had an annual household income of $4,999 or less, and 31% reported having an income between $10,000 and $14,999. The demographic questionnaire, the Perceived Health Competence Scale, the Barriers Scale, the Health promoting Lifestyle Profile-11, the Lubben Social Network Scale, and the Short Form-120®, Version 2 Health Survey were used to collect data.These participants reported high perceived self-efficacy (Mean = 37.35, SD = 6.76), which was positively related to a health-promoting lifestyle (r = 0.20, p2 = 0.15, F = 8.03, p = 0.01). Perceived self-efficacy and perceived barriers were the predictors of mental health (R2 = 0.29, F = 18.74, p = 0.01).

Rights

© The Author

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

June 2008

Included in

Nursing Commons

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