Defense Date

2009

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Public Health

Department

Epidemiology & Community Health

First Advisor

Kate Lapane

Abstract

Background: Cancer is the second leading cause of death in economically developed countries. The use and availability of oral treatment for cancer has increased dramatically in the past 10 years. Few studies have described the use of oral chemotherapy in non-traditional ambulatory settings by health care professionals across different specialties. Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe the usage of oral chemotherapeutic medications in ambulatory settings. Methods: Cross sectional study of 2007 NAMCS Survey analysis involving 21,761 subjects aged 18 years and above with cancer who participated in the 2007 National Ambulatory Medical Survey (NAMCS). Main Outcome Measure: Physician-reported use of oral chemotherapeutic medications (includes all major drug classes) as indicated on questionnaire for 2007 NAMCS survey. Results: Health care providers in non-traditional settings are less likely to prescribe oral chemotherapy than in traditional ambulatory settings (Adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=0.65{95% confidence interval: 0.61-0.69}). The study results suggest that oncologists are prescribing oral anti-cancer drugs the most as compared to other physician specialties. Conclusion: Health care providers in non-traditional settings are less likely to prescribe oral chemotherapy than in traditional ambulatory settings. Primary care physicians may have limited experience in monitoring and prescribing these potentially toxic medications. Clear guidelines are required for the use of oral chemotherapy medications, considering the potential for their use in non-traditional ambulatory settings and by non-oncologists.

Rights

© The Author

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

December 2009

Included in

Epidemiology Commons

Share

COinS