Defense Date

2009

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Public Health

Department

Epidemiology & Community Health

First Advisor

Irene Lubker

Abstract

Breast and prostate cancer incidence and mortality have been steadily decreasing. Reasons for these reductions may be related to increased rates of cancer screening and other factors such as improvements in diet, including consumption of fruits and vegetables. We wanted to determine if individuals who get screened for breast and prostate cancer are more or less likely to consume adequate servings of fruit and vegetables. A cross-sectional study using the BRFSS survey was conducted. Individuals included in this study (n=26,222), were asked about their breast or prostate cancer screening history. They were also asked about their servings per day of fruit and vegetables. Statistical analyses were conducted using the SAS 9.2 software program. Logistic regression analyses were conducted on the variables and potential confounders. Over 40% of individuals who did not screen for breast and prostate cancer were in the 50-59 years of age category. A trend was seen with younger age groups being less likely to consume 3 or more daily servings of fruit and vegetables than their older counterparts. Another trend was seen in education levels. Individuals with lower education were less likely to consume at least 3 daily servings of fruit and vegetables. There was a statistically significant association between cancer screening and servings of fruit and vegetables per day. Individuals who were screened for either breast or prostate cancer were 52% more likely to consume 3 or more servings of fruit and vegetables than those who did not screen for either breast or prostate cancer (OR=1.52, 95% CI: 1.29-1.79). Further research needs to be conducted related to how other health behaviors may be related to cancer screening adherence and fruit/vegetable intake.

Rights

© The Author

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

December 2009

Included in

Epidemiology Commons

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