Defense Date

2010

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Public Policy & Administration

First Advisor

Jill A. Gordon

Second Advisor

Robyn Diehl

Third Advisor

David Patrick Geary

Fourth Advisor

Alican Dalkilic

Abstract

This dissertation explores the relationship between social, economical, and demographic variables and reported violent and property crime incidents in the provinces of Turkey between 2000 and 2007. The data on violent and property crimes comes from Turkish National Police. All other variables are secondary data gathered from open sources and Turkstat. The research is one of the first studies to examine this relationship in Turkey. The findings of the study suggest that family disruption rate and gross domestic product were significantly related to the violent crime rate while family disruption rate, gross domestic product, population, population density, and urbanization rate were significantly related to the property crime rate in the provinces of Turkey at bivariate level. The findings of the multivariate analysis for violent crimes reveal strong support that high school graduation rate, family disruption rate and gross domestic product have a considerable significant positive impact on violent crimes while unemployment rate and urbanization rate have significant negative relationship with violent crimes in the provinces of Turkey. Likewise, the findings of the multivariate analysis for property crimes reveal strong support that high school graduation rate, family disruption rate, gross domestic product and population in a province have a considerable significant positive impact on the number of property crimes in a province in Turkey. Implications of findings and policy recommendations and future research suggestions are also discussed.

Rights

© The Author

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

February 2010

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