Defense Date

2010

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Interdisciplinary Studies

Department

Interdisciplinary Studies

First Advisor

Sara Clark

Abstract

My textile work is about noticing the beauty of natural creation from extreme perspectives. I reference the patchwork quality of landscapes by finding the lines, patterns and color fields in aerial photography and translating them into a textile medium. Looking at land and water from an airborne vantage point feels like reading a good poem. I can’t quite determine the precise meaning but the individual phrases and their arrangement in a composition send a shiver of pleasure up my spine. In the same way, I can’t exactly identify what I’m seeing from afar, but the beauty of the parts relating to the whole rings true. At the other end of the spectrum, I am fascinated with the idea that tiny particles assemble in millions to create those patches of land and riverbed threads. It strikes me that the microscopic, enclosed, underground or hidden elements are closely connected to the larger more overt images of nature. I can’t fully see the seeds within the pod’s protective shawl, nor the connecting trails of underground invertebrates. However, with close inspection and imagination, I suggest the shape and color, texture and trajectory of these agents of change.

Rights

© The Author

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

February 2010

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