Defense Date

2011

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Environmental Studies

First Advisor

Kevin Caillouët

Abstract

Current methods of mosquito surveillance estimate general population abundances, but fail to represent the relationship of vector abundance to host density important to determining transmission risk of mosquito-borne pathogens (MBP). We sought to address this limitation by creating a novel mosquito trap that directly sampled mosquitoes seeking to feed on nesting birds. The primary objectives of this study were to (1) assess the efficiency of the Nest Mosquito Trap (NMT) and how this is affected by nest box size. (2) assess whether the NMT affects bird, specifically nest success in Prothonotary Warblers (Protonotaria citrea), and adult behavior. (3) compare our novel trap to existing methods. (4) profile the ecological parameters associated with bird/ mosquito interactions. Our results allow us to conclude that the NMT is not only an effective means of capturing host-seeking mosquitoes and measuring mosquito/ bird interactions, but does not have a deleterious effect on avian nesting success.

Rights

© The Author

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

August 2011

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