Defense Date

2014

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Clinical Psychology

First Advisor

Clarissa Holmes

Abstract

The aim of the current study was to examine the associations among youth diabetes self-efficacy, family conflict, disease care and glycemic control via a comprehensive path model. Data were from a baseline assessment of a longitudinal RCT of 257 adolescent/parent dyads (adolescents aged 11–14). Each member of the dyad separately completed the Self-efficacy for Diabetes Self-Management Scale, Family Environment Conflict subscale, Diabetes Family Conflict Scale, Diabetes Behavior Rating Scale, and 24-hr Diabetes Interview Blood Glucose Frequency subscale. Additionally, a biological marker of glycemic control, or HbA1c, and relevant demographic variables were collected. A mediation model found higher youth diabetes self-efficacy mediated the link between lower family conflict and better disease care (β = -.08, p <.01) to glycemic control (β = .05, p <.05.). Further, the relation of higher self-efficacy to better glycemic control was mediated by better disease care (β = -.06, p <.05). Higher youth diabetes self-efficacy (β = -.16, p <.05), lower family conflict (β = .19, p <.001), and better disease care (β = -.17, p <.01) each were directly related to better glycemic control. The overall model with relevant demographic factors fit the data well [χ² (2) = .50, p = .78, CFI = 1.00, RMSEA= .00] and accounted for 13% of the variance in self-efficacy, 32% of the variance for disease care, and 25% of the variance in glycemic control. Interventions that target better youth diabetes self-efficacy and lower family conflict concurrently may promote better disease care and glycemic control.

Rights

© The Author

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

8-18-2014

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