Defense Date

2015

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Political Science & Public Administration

First Advisor

Nancy Stutts

Second Advisor

Susan Gooden

Third Advisor

Saltanat Liebert

Fourth Advisor

Charles Calderwood

Abstract

This study explores the turnover intentions of fundraisers employed by 501(c)(3) public charities in the United States. Specifically, the study considers the effects of the following variables on fundraisers’ intentions to leave their current position (in the short-term and long-term) and/or the profession of fundraising: perceptions of fit with organization and job; exchange relationships between employees and their organization and supervisor; overall job satisfaction; culture of philanthropy; salary; age; and organizational size. Through a secondary analysis of a national data set, multiple regression analysis identifies the variables that are statistically significant predictors of turnover intentions.

Perceived person-organization fit, job satisfaction, and age are supported as the significant predictors of long-term turnover intentions. Fundraisers who believe they fit well with the culture of their organization, are highly satisfied with their job, and are older will likely stay in their position longer. Perceived person-organization fit and job satisfaction are supported as the significant predictors of short-term turnover intentions. Similar to long-term turnover intentions, but without the effect of age, fundraisers who perceive a high level of congruence with their organization’s culture, and who are satisfied with their job, are less likely to have plans to give notice. Lastly, perceived person-job fit and job satisfaction are supported as the significant predictors of intentions to leave the field of fundraising. Fundraisers who report that their position is a good match for their abilities, and who are highly satisfied in their position, are more likely to remain committed to fundraising as a career.

Rights

© The Author

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

5-8-2015