Defense Date

2015

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Health Related Sciences

First Advisor

Al Copolillo

Abstract

Workplace discrimination for individuals with visual impairments in the U.S. is an ongoing issue dating before the founding of the EEOC and the enactment of the ADA. Despite laws enacted to protect against unequal treatment in the workplace, the EEOC continues to receive submissions of formal discrimination charges from individuals with visual impairments.

The workplace is experiencing changes with increasing amounts of older adults, women, minorities, and the use of technology and the Internet. By examining characteristics of the discrimination charges and the resulting outcomes, the knowledge gained can describe the current situation and the historical progression of workplace discrimination for individuals with visual impairments. The purpose of this cross-sectional study is to understand through descriptive, non-parametric, and logistical regression analyses of secondary data, meaningful associations regarding workplace discrimination and Americans with visual impairments.

Study results showed that charging party characteristics of age, gender, and race were found to be predictive of types of discrimination charges and resolutions outcomes. Respondent characteristics of employer region of location, size, and industry were also found to be predictive of types of discrimination charges and resolution outcomes. Differences were revealed between discrimination charges before and after the enactment of the ADAAA, yet not between resolution outcomes before and after the enactment of the ADAAA. Additionally, discrimination charges and resolution outcomes were determined to be associated with one another. Implications for employees, employers, and professionals who work with individuals with visual impairments are addressed and recommendations for further research are provided.

Rights

© The Author

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

12-28-2015

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