Defense Date

2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Dentistry

Department

Dentistry

First Advisor

Dr. Thomas C. Waldrop

Second Advisor

Dr. Janina Deeb

Third Advisor

Dr. Harvey Schenkein

Abstract

Clinicians have described the success rates of dental implants. The use of implants is projected to increase in the future. With a 5-10% failure rate, it is unclear the exact factors that are associated with implant failures. To improve upon these success rates, it is critical to understand parameters associated with implant failure including: periodontitis, peri-implantitis, systemic diseases, site preparation, dental history of the implant site, bone quality, materials, occlusion, and treatment timelines. While bone quality is associated with failure, objective measures to assess bone quality and characteristics are scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study is to determine whether possible comorbidities, associated dental parameters, and measurable bone quality are possible predictors of implant failure.

In this study, we utilized the electronic health record system axiUm® to retrospectively investigate non-failed (NF) and failed (F) dental implants from a patient cohort with 149 implants placed between 2012-2015 at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry. A chart review was conducted extracting information on age, gender, systemic diseases, smoking, occlusal trauma, parafunction, bone grafting history, treatment timelines, implant site/type/placement protocol, infection, torque at placement, bone quality and microarchitecture assessed by the novel, innovative technology: trabecular bone score (TBS).

A total of 149 implants, 46 failures and 105 non-failed controls, were selected based on similar implant sites. Preliminary data obtained from analysis suggests that average time from implant placement to failure was 6.6 months (0.55 years). Parafunction habit (p=0.0202) and increased number of implants (p=0.0478) were found to be associated with increased implant failure.

Rights

© The Author

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

5-10-2016

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