Defense Date

1988

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Business

First Advisor

Charles H. Smith

Abstract

This dissertation addresses the problem of setting due dates to minimize completion inaccuracy penalties in a general job shop environment. In this simulation study, lateness penalties are generated by four defined functions: lateness variance, mean squared lateness, mean absolute lateness, and semi-quadratic lateness. Each of these functions assigns positive penalties to both early and late job completions.

The study proposes and demonstrates the benefits of an iterative simulation-regression procedure in determining allowance policies. Advantages of operation-based dispatching rules over job-based dispatching rules, as well as improvements to traditional methods of setting operation due dates, are demonstrated. Characteristics and benefits of incorporating shop congestion variables in due date setting procedures under different combinations of expected shop utilization and processing time assumptions are evaluated.

Comments

Scanned, with permission from the author, from the original print version, which resides in University Archives.

Rights

© The Author

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

11-29-2016

Included in

Business Commons

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