Document Type

Article

Original Publication Date

2016

Journal/Book/Conference Title

JOURNAL OF PAIN AND SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT

Volume

52

Issue

3

First Page

437

Last Page

445

DOI of Original Publication

10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2016.02.014

Comments

Originally published at http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2016.02.014.

Date of Submission

January 2017

Abstract

This article synthesizes the presentations and conclusions of an international symposium on Phase 1 oncology trials, palliative care, and ethics held in 2014. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the intersection of three independent trends that unfolded in the past decade. First, large-scale reviews of hundreds of Phase I trials have indicated there is a relatively low risk of serious harm and some prospect of clinical benefit that can be meaningful to patients. Second, changes in the design and analysis of Phase I trials, the introduction of ''targeted'' investigational agents that are generally less toxic, and an increase in Phase I trials that combine two or more agents in a novel way have changed the conduct of these trials and decreased fears and apprehensions about participation. Third, the field of palliative care in cancer has expanded greatly, offering symptom management to late-stage cancer patients, and demonstrated that it is not mutually exclusive with disease-targeted therapies or clinical research. Opportunities for collaboration and further research at the intersection of Phase 1 oncology trials and palliative care are highlighted.

Rights

© 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Is Part Of

VCU Massey Cancer Center Publications

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