Medical Education Symposium

First Author Information

Michael Czekajlo, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Division of Critical Care, Medical Director, Hunter Homes McGuire Center for Simulation and Healthcare Innovation, Hunter Holmes McGuire VA Medical Center

Additional Author(s) Information

Anthony J. Laporta, MD,FACS, Rocky Vista University

Alan Moloff, DO,MPH, Rocky Vista University

Reginald Franciose MD,FACS, Vail Valley Medical Center, CO

Roy Alson MD,PHD, Wake Forest University, NC

Tuan N. Hoang MD,FACS, Medical Readiness Division, San Diego Naval Surface Forces US Pacific Fleet, San Diego, CA

Douglas A. Granger PHD, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing; Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland

Presentation Format

Oral

Type of Activity

Research

Original Presentation Date

2017

Date of Submission

May 2017

Abstract/Short Description

A 4.5 day full immersion intensive skills week for emergency medicine and surgical training for finishing second year medical students was performed on a 20 acre movie studio. Utilizing hyper-realistic medical emergency scenarios, we simulated all events beginning at the point of injury, continuing to treatment en route, and ending at transition of care to surgical intervention. The trainees staffed an emergency room (ER) and two operating rooms (OR), triaged multiple victims and performed real surgical procedures on role-playing actors wearing the Human Worn Partial Task Surgical Simulator. Saliva was collected before and after scenarios (i.e., multiple victims from an accident, gun fight, and improvised explosive device) and assayed for cortisol and alpha-amylase (sAA). In addition EKG data looking at R-R interval data was collected. Results from the salivary biometrics and heart rate variability data about the stress response and learning suggests that we are able to identify not only habituation but also whether the student is capable of learning/performing in a given scenario.

Purpose/Research Question

Can biometrics measuring the stress response be used to identify habituation?

Objectives

1)THIS PROJECT IS TO IDENTIFY THE CORRECT PHYSIOLOGIC MARKERS OF STRESS AND HABITUATION THOUGHT TO BE ASSOCIATED WITH IMPROVED COMPLEX EDUCATION.

2)LONG TERM OUR OBJECTIVE IS TO SHOW THAT REALISTIC IMMERSION SIMULATION TRAINING IS BETTER THAN CONVENTIONAL EDUCATION METHODS.

References

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