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Abstract

Alcohol use is prevalent among college students and many participate in risky drinking behaviors over the course of their college careers, leading to negative consequences. The social norms theory posits that individuals behave based on their perceptions of peer behavior. Overestimation of peers’ problem behavior is associated with increase in their own problem behavior. The Stall Seat Journal (SSJ), developed by the Wellness Resource Center, is used in part to help correct common misperceptions, including those related to peer alcohol use. Our study aimed to see if Stall Seat Journal readership was associated with perception of peer alcohol use among VCU students and if perception of peer alcohol use was associated with alcohol use outcomes. We performed linear multiple regression for continuous dependent variables and logistic regression for binary dependent variables and controlled for gender and cohort. Responses from 4290 VCU Students who participated in the Spring 2015 Spit for Science Survey were used in this study. Stall Seat Journal readership was negatively associated with perception of peer alcohol use (β = - 0.05, p < .01). The correlation was weak but statistically significant. Perception of alcohol use was not significantly related to frequency of alcohol use (β = 0.01, p >.05), but was significantly associated with quantity of alcohol use (β = 0.20, p < .01) and likelihood of experiencing blackout (odds ratio = 1.12, p < .05). Based on our findings, Stall Seat Journal readership can be used to positively influence college students and potentially lessen risky drinking.

Publication Date

2016

Disciplines

Applied Behavior Analysis | Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms | Developmental Psychology | Personality and Social Contexts | Social Psychology

Current Academic Year

Freshman

Faculty Advisor/Mentor

Amy Adkins, Ph.D.

Faculty Advisor/Mentor

Danielle Dick, Ph.D.

Faculty Advisor/Mentor

Kenneth Kendler, M.D.

Rights

© The Author(s)