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Abstract

This study examined the relationship between deviant high school behavior, as defined by symptoms of conduct disorder, and frequency of alcohol and cigarette use in the past 30 days in college freshman at VCU. Deviant high school behaviors included skipping school, running away, stealing, starting a fire, destroying property, hurting animals or people, using weapons, fighting, and lying. The sample included first year freshmen at VCU who participated in the Spit for Science study. The software SPSS was used to calculate the significance of the correlations between deviant high school behavior and frequency of alcohol and cigarette use. A sum score was created for each individual based on their endorsement and frequency of each deviant behavior. There was a positive, significant correlation between deviant high school behavior and frequency of alcohol and cigarette use (p=.0001 and p=.0001, respectively). This suggested that there is a relationship between high school students’ deviant behavior, as defined by symptoms of conduct disorder, and the use of alcohol and cigarettes once they attend college. This study suggests risk factors for substance use in the VCU student body.

Publication Date

2013

Subject Major(s)

Biology, Psychology

Current Academic Year

Junior

Faculty Advisor/Mentor

Danielle Dick

Sponsorship

Virginia Commonwealth University. Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program

Is Part Of

VCU Undergraduate Research Posters

Rights

© The Author(s)

Spit for Science: The relationship between deviant high school behavior and college substance use

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