Author ORCID Identifier

0000-0002-6940-5781

Defense Date

2018

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Caroline Cobb

Abstract

The purpose of this online cross-sectional study was to identify cannabis user profiles by administration method and examine how differential cannabis policies influence intentions among young adults. Participants were assigned randomly to one of three hypothetical cannabis policy conditions (recreationally legal; medically legal; illegal). Within conditions, participants completed measures regarding cannabis use, including administration methods, cannabis attitudes, norms, perceived behavioral control, self-efficacy, and intentions. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to determine sub-groups of past 30-day cannabis users by administration method followed by sub-group comparisons. Condition effects on intentions and associated variables were examined using ANCOVA. Four classes (Low-Blunt, Low-Bong, Mod-Poly, High-Poly) differing in demographics and tobacco use were identified. Recreationally and medically legal policy conditions resulted in more favorable cannabis attitudes, higher selfefficacy, and higher intentions to use compared to the illegal policy condition. Results inform cannabis intervention efforts and longitudinal research on the effects of cannabis policy changes.

Rights

© The Author

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

4-13-2018

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