Defense Date

2018

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Anatomy & Neurobiology

First Advisor

Jeffrey L. Dupree

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS), a demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS), affects approximately 400,000 individuals in the United States, and 2.5 million people worldwide. It is a leading cause of disability in young adults. Current treatments for MS target the inflammatory aspects of the disease, but do not aid in remyelination. To address remyelination as a therapeutic strategy, it is imperative to identify mechanisms that regulate myelin formation, including epigenetic targets. In this study, we investigate the role of the LMNA, a gene encoding Lamins A and C, intermediate filaments of the nuclear lamina, in regulating oligodendrocyte development and myelination in the CNS. Using electron microscopic analyses, I examined levels of heterochromatin and its distribution in the oligodendrocyte nucleus as an indicator of gene expression, oligodendrocyte maturity, and myelin formation in the absence of A type lamins.. While overall levels of heterochromatin in oligodendrocytes were not altered in the absence of A type lamins, peripherally located heterochromatin was reduced and thinner myelin was observed in the spinal cord. My observations present novel findings for the role of LMNA in oligodendrocytes and myelination.

Rights

© The Author

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

5-9-2018

Available for download on Monday, May 08, 2023

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