Author ORCID Identifier

https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0466-2282

Defense Date

2018

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Medical Physics

First Advisor

Elisabeth Weiss

Abstract

ADVANCED IMAGING ANALYSIS FOR PREDICTING TUMOR RESPONSE AND IMPROVING CONTOUR DELINEATION UNCERTAINTY

By Rebecca Nichole Mahon, MS

A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Virginia Commonwealth University, 2018

Major Director: Dr. Elisabeth Weiss,

Professor,

Department of Radiation Oncology

Radiomics, an advanced form of imaging analysis, is a growing field of interest in medicine. Radiomics seeks to extract quantitative information from images through use of computer vision techniques to assist in improving treatment. Early prediction of treatment response is one way of improving overall patient care. This work seeks to explore the feasibility of building predictive models from radiomic texture features extracted from magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images of lung cancer patients. First, repeatable primary tumor texture features from each imaging modality were identified to ensure a sufficient number of repeatable features existed for model development. Then a workflow was developed to build models to predict overall survival and local control using single modality and multi-modality radiomics features. The workflow was also applied to normal tissue contours as a control study. Multiple significant models were identified for the single modality MR- and CT-based models, while the multi-modality models were promising indicating exploration with a larger cohort is warranted.

Another way advances in imaging analysis can be leveraged is in improving accuracy of contours. Unfortunately, the tumor can be close in appearance to normal tissue on medical images creating high uncertainty in the tumor boundary. As the entire defined target is treated, providing physicians with additional information when delineating the target volume can improve the accuracy of the contour and potentially reduce the amount of normal tissue incorporated into the contour. Convolution neural networks were developed and trained to identify the tumor interface with normal tissue and for one network to identify the tumor location. A mock tool was presented using the output of the network to provide the physician with the uncertainty in prediction of the interface type and the probability of the contour delineation uncertainty exceeding 5mm for the top three predictions.

Rights

© The Author

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

6-13-2018

Available for download on Thursday, June 13, 2019

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