Defense Date

2018

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Health Related Sciences

First Advisor

Chuck Biddle

Second Advisor

Mary Carey

Third Advisor

Cecil Drain

Fourth Advisor

Corey Davis

Fifth Advisor

Lemont Kier

Abstract

ABSTRACT

ASSESSING BASELINE AND POST-DISCHARGE RISK FACTORS IN SUBJECTS WITH AND WITHOUT SLEEP APNEA UNDERGOING ENDOSCOPY WITH DEEP SEDATION

Background: Outpatient procedures encompass over 60% of all surgeries in the United States, and the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) remains high among adult surgical ambulatory patients. Ambulatory surgery poses problems for patients with OSA because narcotics and anesthetics used during surgery can complicate the negative effects of OSA, leading to cardiac events, brain hypoxia, and even death. This study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of cardiopulmonary risk factors among post endoscopic patients with diagnosed and undiagnosed sleep apnea. Methods: The study involved a prospective, descriptive cross-sectional design and incorporated a pre-test or post-test data collection approach, using Actigraphy, pulse oximetry and 24-hour ECG monitoring via Bluetooth technology to monitor outpatients undergoing endoscopy with deep Propofol sedation. Patients were recruited pre-procedure to obtain a resting baseline ECG, and pre-procedure values were then monitored post procedure continuously for 24 hours. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. A target sample included 50 adult outpatients from a Florida suburban endoscopy center. Results: Pulse oximetry and Actigraph scores revealed no difference based on OSA. The ANOVA for oxygen desaturation events and sleep quality indices reflected no differences across groups. Sleep quality had no measurable influence on adverse events and was similar across groups; participants diagnosed with OSA slept longer than those in the untreated or no OSA group. Regressions for sleep quality indices reflected no differences among groups. Conclusions: There remains a lack of literature on cardiopulmonary and ECG indicators of cardiac risks in patients with OSA in the 24 hours following discharge from ambulatory surgery. This dissertation characterized the ECG at baseline and post-discharge among post-endoscopy outpatients with OSA and without OSA. Further research is recommended.

Rights

© The Author

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

12-12-2018

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