Defense Date

2019

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Public Policy & Administration

First Advisor

Dr. Nancy Stutts

Second Advisor

Dr. Richard Huff

Third Advisor

Dr. Myung JIn

Fourth Advisor

Dr. Andrew Schoeneman

Abstract

Using rated responses from nonprofit CEOs who participated in the 2016 BoardSource national survey, this study investigates whether nonprofit board inclusive behavior or board inclusive practices are positively correlated with nonprofit board effectiveness. It further examines whether a critical mass of racial and ethnic minority or women board members may moderate the relationship stated above. To answer these questions, the study tested six hypotheses using principal component analysis, followed by hierarchical regression analysis, and found no evidence of statistical significance in main or moderator effects. The study recommends that policymakers should frame policies that ensure mandatory quotas for women and racioethnic minority board members for nonprofits that receive government funding and/or act as alternative service delivery agents for governments. In addition, the nonprofit CEOs should promote the learning-integration perspective of group inclusion to help maximize the experience of inclusion of board members. The study further recommends that nonprofit boards should promote pluralistic diversity, abandon tokenism, and foster an inclusive environment for all board members irrespective of their gender and color.

Rights

© The Author

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

4-24-2019

Available for download on Monday, April 22, 2024

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