Author ORCID Identifier

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5198-9707

Defense Date

2019

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Health Related Sciences

First Advisor

Michael D. Fallacaro, DNS, CRNA, FAAN

Second Advisor

Suzanne Wright, PhD, CRNA

Third Advisor

Melanie Wright, PhD

Fourth Advisor

Diane Dodd-McCue, DBA

Fifth Advisor

Nickie Damico, PhD, CRNA

Abstract

Anesthesia is a health care specialty fraught with high workload demands, stressful work environments, increased production pressure, work areas with many distractions, an increasing use of advanced technology, and the constant need to prioritize work actions. Effective clinical judgment in this dynamic environment necessitates that the provider demonstrate the ability to project what may occur secondary to actual or potential condition changes. These key elements operationalize situation awareness (SA).

High level SA is an important characteristic for the successful development of student registered nurse anesthetists (SRNAs). With Endsley’s “Theory of Situation Awareness” as the foundation, the goal of this study was to adapt and validate the “Situation Awareness Global Assessment Technique” (SAGAT), to quantify SRNAs' SA during a specific simulated anesthesia event.

With IRB approval, purposeful sampling identified a group of CRNA, nurse educator subjects and an exploratory sequential mixed methods design utilized. Delphi methods during qualitative data collection and validation used a seven-member sample. Content analysis resulted in items for the adapted SAGAT. Quantitative methods utilized data collected from a second 40-member sample yielding item content validity and scale content validity indices (S-CVI/Ave. 0.92). Additionally, exploratory factor analysis provided further reliability with a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.937.

Findings revealed that a SAGAT specific to the anesthesia domain and the SRNA subgroup was amenable to adaptation and validation, providing positive implications in SRNA education and training. Additionally, results support the further adaptation, validation, and use of this instrument in other anesthetic content areas, as well as other health care domains.

Rights

© The Author

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

4-26-2019

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