Defense Date

2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. Shawn O. Utsey

Second Advisor

Dr. Paul Perrin

Third Advisor

Dr. Jamie Cage

Abstract

The first goal for the study was to estimate trait effects and social influences for racial centrality, racial private regard, and racial public regard. The second was to estimate correlational relationships between racial identity, depression, and anxiety symptoms. The study used 110 Black university students (Mage=19.5,SD=4.13) from a southeastern American university. Restricted maximum likelihood estimation was conducted to estimate variance components for all constructs. Racial centrality, racial private regard, and racial public regard consisted of mostly trait effects, although reflecting substantial social influences. Correlational findings indicated that providers who evoked high racial centrality also evoked low depression, low anxiety, and were seen as supportive. Providers who evoked racial private regard also evoked low depression, low anxiety, and were seen as supportive. Socially influenced racial public regard had no statistically significant links to other constructs. Findings suggest socially influenced racial identity holds links to mental health outcomes and social support.

Rights

© Sultan A. Hubbard

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

4-29-2019

Included in

Psychology Commons

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