Defense Date

2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Dentistry

Department

Dentistry

First Advisor

Erica Brecher, DMD, MS

Second Advisor

Caroline Carrico, PhD

Third Advisor

Patrice Wunsch, DDS, MS

Abstract

Purpose: Evaluate behavior assessment and agreement among dentist, guardian, and child. Evaluate child behavior by appointment type.

Methods: Patients recruited from the pediatric dental department at Virginia Commonwealth University for this convenience sample. Inclusion criteria: patients presenting for clinical exams and/or restorative treatment without the use of advanced behavior guidance between August 29, 2018, and March 7, 2019; ages 4-12-years-old; and scheduled with a single clinician. Appointments were stratified by difficulty. Behavior was assessed by dentist and caregiver using the Frankl Scale. Patient self-assessed cooperation using an age-appropriate modified Frankl Scale, developed for this study. Agreement assessed among the 3 scores at each appointment using descriptive statistics and Cohen’s Kappa. Behavior trends across appointment type assessed using Kruskal-Wallis test. SAS software (2013, Cary, NC). P-value < 0.05.

Results: Forty-one patient-guardian dyads enrolled in the study. Five dyads experienced multiple encounters. Demographics for the patients enrolled: 59% male; 44% Caucasian, 29% African American, 5% Asian, 2% Hispanic, 20% other/multiracial. Average patient age: 7.6 (range: 4- 12). Most patients had 1 encounter (n=36, 88%). Frankl Score agreement for provider/guardian was 79% (k=0.335), provider/child was 70% (k=0.248), and guardian/child was 81% (k=0.314). In disagreements, guardians rated behavior better than provider. Disagreement was split for provider/child and guardian/child, with the child tending to rate themselves higher, and the guardian tending to rate the child higher respectively. Marginal evidence that hard appointments resulted in poorer behaviors.

Conclusion: There is fair agreement between child, guardian, and provider. In disagreements, guardians tend to rate the child’s behavior better compared to the provider and child self-assessment. Dental providers tend to be more critical of patient behavior. Marginal evidence to support harder appointments result in poorer behaviors.

Rights

© Cole Anthony Staines DDS 2019

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

5-3-2019

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