Defense Date

2020

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Education

First Advisor

Dr. Lisa Abrams

Second Advisor

Dr. James McMillan

Third Advisor

Dr. Hillary Parkhouse

Fourth Advisor

Dr. Rachel Gable

Abstract

This study investigated K-12 educators’ (N=154) teaching for global readiness practices; perceptions of individual global competencies; and supports needed to provide all students an equitable education. A fully mixed, concurrent triangulation, equal status design, combined Vessa’s (2016) Teaching for Global Readiness Scale (TfGRS) and McCain et al.’s (2014) Globally Competent Learning Continuum (GCLC) to examine educators’ perceptions of teaching for global readiness. Perceptions of district equity initiatives were obtained through teacher interviews and central office administrator questionnaires. Survey results for the second semester of the 2018 school year reported teachers engaged in critical literacy and transactional practices from “never” to “once a month”; integrated global learning practices from “less than once a month” to “2-3 times per month”; and engaged in situated practices from “less than once a month” to “once a week”. Teacher agreement with situated practices during the second semester ranged from “strongly disagree” to “disagree”, while responses to integrated global learning experiences ranged from “less than once a month” to “2-3 times a month”. Teacher perceptions of their global competencies ranged from “progressing” to “advanced” in terms of dispositions, “beginning” to “proficient” in terms of knowledge, and “nascent” to “progressing” in terms of skills. Human and monetary resources were identified as additional supports; particularly the

Teaching for Global Readiness 11 need for more staff, student learning materials, and quality professional development. Results of the study provided additional information on the reliability and validity of current global education tools and baseline information of one district's teaching for global readiness practices. Based on the study it is recommended policy makers investigate the development of national and/or state global education teaching and learning standards.

Rights

© The Author

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

12-11-2020

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