Defense Date

2021

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Public Policy & Administration

First Advisor

Dr. Elsie Harper-Anderson

Second Advisor

Dr. I-Shian (Ivan) Suen

Third Advisor

Dr. Simon Okoth

Fourth Advisor

Dr. Lindsey Evans

Abstract

Rapid urbanization is currently taking place in developing regions that have yet to address already existing and persistent inequities within their urban centers. There is perhaps no urban policy issue more critical for governments of the global South than the elimination of slums and informal settlements, along with the development of equitable access to affordable housing for low-income residents. Ethiopia has taken on this challenge through its Integrated Housing Development Program (IHDP), which incorporates slum clearance and resettlement through a government-led development of condominium housing targeting those displaced and other low and middle-income residents in the city.

Since the launch of the program in 2005, the IHDP has delivered over 175,000 units to recipients as of 2020. While some slum clearance has occurred in the city center, construction of most condominiums has taken place at large-scale conglomerations at peri-urban locations on the periphery of the city. These sites are far from the city center, where most social and economic activity continues to be concentrated, thus giving rise to questions of social and spatial equity. Utilizing survey data, this dissertation compared the perceptions of urban and peri-urban residents living at IHDP sites on their overall satisfaction living in their condominium as well as dimensions of social and spatial equity. The analysis found that those living at peri-urban sites perceived lower levels of social and spatial equity compared to urban IHDP residents. Moreover, their perception of social and spatial equity mediates the relationship between their location (urban or peri-urban) and their level of overall satisfaction living at their IHDP condominium. These findings have significant implications for how urban planners balance their need to meet the tremendous demand for housing with addressing the equity and spatial justice implications of their approach.

Rights

© Nathan Teklemariam

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

5-14-2021

Available for download on Wednesday, May 13, 2026

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