Defense Date

2022

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Jeffrey D. Green

Abstract

The research examined the role of moral identity in motivating prosocial behavior, specifically volunteer fundraising measured in dollars via Facebook fundraisers for the Spina Bifida Association, a national nonprofit organization. I predicted a three-way interaction of moral identity symbolization, internalization, and recognition (i.e., public acknowledgment of the gift by the organization) to predict prosocial behavior. When moral identity internalization is low, I hypothesized that high moral identity symbolization will motivate recognized prosocial behavior due to the opportunity to have one’s prosocial behavior in a public venue. In contrast, when moral identity internalization is high, prosocial behavior would be motivated regardless of the level of symbolization and recognition. The main effect of recognition on fundraising was not significant, nor were the predicted interactions regarding identity symbolization, internalization, and recognition. Notably, empathy was significantly and positively associated with monies raised.

Rights

© The Author

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

6-29-2002

Share

COinS