Defense Date

2017

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Biomedical Engineering

First Advisor

Dianne T.V. Pawluk

Abstract

Vibrotactile feedback offers a unique opportunity to augment or reconstruct impaired tactile sensations, whether that be in the form of enhancing prosthetics or specialized protective clothing. Important information about temperature and object slippage serve to endanger the human operator or equipment. This thesis presents three experiments which investigate amplitude modulated vibrotactile signals as a scalar dimension of roughness, the effect those signals and their locations (finger pad, forearm, bicep) have on the performance of two tasks: the sensing of temperatures simulated by vibrotactile signals and gripping an object of simulated surface texture. The results show task performance increase when the feedback and site of action are co-located for sensory tasks and decrease for manipulatory tasks.

Rights

© Matthew Standard

Is Part Of

VCU University Archives

Is Part Of

VCU Theses and Dissertations

Date of Submission

12-13-2017

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